FLY PIG FLY!!

FLY PIG FLY!!

Best Ever Debrief Strategy

The debrief is a great opportunity for instructors to facilitate the learning process by encouraging the student to recognize their achievements and what they did correctly as well as help them realize what is needed to move forward in their skill development. The student must become more aware of their strengths and weaknesses and take responsibility for their training. The Debrief, much like the Ground, can be divided into both the Content and the Presentation. The instructor’s role during the debrief should be one of a facilitator. Asking questions and directing the student to the right information through self-realization will be of greater benefit to the student.

Content

In the air, your job was to observe and respond. Back on the ground, your job is to take time to recall as many details and altitudes as possible. Next, group details into what went right, and what needs improvement.

Positives

Identifying where a student performs correctly is important, as it establishes key actions that you want repeated. This is not necessarily meant to be encouragement or cheerleading. The primary purpose of choosing details of what went well is to reinforce correct action. If you draw attention to critical items performed well that need to continue, your student is more likely to be aware of those items and repeat them next time. Choose items to mention that build on fundamentals and good habits.

Improvement points

By nature, it is easier for most people to be able to list events that did not go as planned. However, a long laundry list in chronological order of everything that went wrong is not helpful for inspiring improvement. Instead, group improvement points together based on trends or based on what one corrective action could solve. Three to five improvement points for the jump is recommended. Make sure you have advice on how to fix the problem. Use specific directives, mentioning a body part and what to do with it, so the student will know how to improve, instead of just what to improve.

Presentation

The instructor’s role during the debrief should be one of a facilitator. Asking questions and directing the student to the right information through self-realization will be of greater benefit to the student.

The debrief process contains the following steps:

  1. restate the goals
  2. things that worked
  3. things that need improvement
  4. how to improve
  5. make new goals

Restate the goals The student will most likely focus on the negative parts of the jump. Restating the goals helps them open up their minds to the rest of the tasks whether it be the exit, break-off or canopy control tasks

 

Things that worked Ask the student what went well on the jump, what he did well. The student will naturally want to focus on the negative, by having him state what he did well on the jump, it starts the debrief on a positive note. This process will need to be repeated on several jumps before the student typically starts to enter the debrief on a positive note stating what they liked about their performance then noting what they need to improve on.

Things that need improvement Ask the student what needs improvement. This lets you know if the student is aware of his errors. If the student overlooks a part of the skydive that should have been recalled, play through the video again and ask him how he felt about performing the skill to see if it jogs his memory. If it does not, this is the instructor’s opportunity to restate the goals of the jump and provide guidance on how to improve.

How to improve Ask this question to the student. The student should have a good idea of what he needs to work on. If the student cannot see the answer, this is the opportunity for the examiner to review the correct techniques and assist him to see what is needed. Patience and good listening skills of the examiner will help the student take charge of his learning and become further committed to his goals.

Make new goals Ask the student what he would like to do on the next jump. If the goals and expectations of each jump are clear, the student should be quite realistic about his performance. If the environment has been set that “mistakes are OK” the student should have a realistic assessment of what he needs to do on the next jump, even if it means repeating the same jump.

One way to structure a debrief, using an easy-to-remember mneumonic that follows the spirit of this debrief presentation is flyPIGfly:

 

 

 

Instructor

Student

fly

favorite

“What was your favorite part?”

Answers something fun, highlight of the jump for them.

P

positive

“What went well?”

Lists several things that they performed well.

I

improve

“What would you want to improve on?”

Lists 3 (max 5) positive-specific improvement points and how to correct them, ordered by safety first. Here’s a great time to get back on the trainer and do more physical practice!
(Corrective Retraining)

“How are you going to make that happen?”

G

goals

“What were the goals for this jump?”
“Did you meet them?”

Lists the goals and if they were met. Use A license proficiency card to track what can be signed off.

fly

future

“Where do we go from here?”

Listens while Coach helps outline what comes next, logging this jump and previewing the next so the cycle of success starts over again!

 

 

  • 1 January 2021
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Best Ever Debrief Strategy

FLY PIG FLY!!

The debrief is a great opportunity for instructors to facilitate the learning process by encouraging the student to recognize their achievements and what they did correctly as well as help them realize what is needed to move forward in their skill development. The student must become more aware of their strengths and weaknesses and take responsibility for their training. The Debrief, much like the Ground, can be divided into both the Content and the Presentation. The instructor’s role during the debrief should be one of a facilitator. Asking questions and directing the student to the right information through self-realization will be of greater benefit to the student.

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